Artist Search
   
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z 

 Selden Connor Gile  (1877 - 1947)

About: Selden Connor Gile
 

Summary

Examples of his work

 
 

Quick facts

Exhibits - current  
 

Biography*

Museums

 
 

Book references

Magazine references pre-2007

 
 

Discussion board

Signature Examples*

 
 
Buy and Sell: Selden Connor Gile
 

For sale ads

Auction results*

 
 

Wanted ads

Auctions upcoming for him*

 
 

Dealers

Auction sales graphs*

 
 

What's my art worth?

Magazine ads pre-1998*

 
 

Market Alert - Free

 
Lived/Active: California/Maine      Known for: modernist landscape, marine and figure painting

Login for full access
 
View AskART Services









*may require subscription
BIOGRAPHY for Selden Gile
Facts/Data
Birth
1877 (Stow, Maine)
 
Death
1947 (Belvedere, California)

Lived/Active
California/Maine

   Share an Image of the Artist

Often Known For
modernist landscape, marine and figure painting

Discussion Board
Would you like to discuss this artist?
AskART Discussion Boards
(3 Active)


Categories of Interest

Fauves/Fauvism
Impressionists Pre 1940
Society of Six
Taos Pre 1940
California Painters
This biography from the Archives of AskART:
The major force behind the Society of Six in the 1920s in the Bay Area of California, Selden Gile set aesthetic standards that espoused color and guided the group with the strength of his personality, physical energy, and warm hospitality.

Departing from dominant decorative and Tonalist influences of Arthur Mathews and William Keith, the Society of Six created a new landscape art of sunny reality; it was Impressionism-Fauvism applied to the California Scene.  The other painters associated with Gile in this rebellion were Maurice Logan, William Clapp, Bernard von Eichman, August Gay, and Louis Siegriest.

Gile was born in Stow, Maine, to parents from Salem, England, and was named for Seldon Connor, Governor of Maine.  The family lived on a farm, but from childhood, he was regarded as different from his boisterous, carousing brothers because of his artistic talents and apparent refinement.  He completed high school in 1894 in Fryeburg and then lived with his brother Frank in Portland, Maine, where he attended Shaw's Business College.  Frank was head chef at the landmark Lafayette Hotel in Portland and taught Gile cooking and convivial hosting, qualities that would later serve him well in California among his artist colleagues.

General Marshall Wentworth, owner of a hostelry in Jackson, New Hampshire, where Selden worked, took an interest in the young man and arranged a job as paymaster and clerk on a vast ranch in Rocklin, California, near Sacramento. Selden's reasons for wanting to head West are unknown, but one of his brothers loaned him fifty dollars for the journey.  His job was dangerous, requiring him to deliver the payroll from the bank to the ranch, and he carried a gun which he sometimes used to defend himself.

He fell in love with Beryl Whitney, daughter of the ranch owners, and was deeply hurt when her parents, disapproving of the relationship, sent her away to Europe and she married another man.  From that time, he had an open aversion to women. In 1905, he moved to Oakland, California, and worked as a salesman of ceramic building materials for Gladding McBean whose products became crucial in the rebuilding of San Francisco after the earthquake.

He was basically self taught as an artist and with high energy and a sturdy build, had a capacity for long hiking trips and outdoor, plein-air painting that he pursued passionately.  Few of his early paintings of California survive, but most existing ones have barns, which became a repeated symbol in his work of the artist himself.

His talents as food and drink host and provider of lodging became legendary.  He shared his house with several aspiring artists and held dinners that he prepared with skill in what was described as an all-male, raucous atmosphere.  Friendship with writer Jack London underscored Gile's seeking out of people that were creative, romantic, assertive, and working class.

With the Six, he exhibited regularly at the Oakland Art Gallery.  In 1927, he moved north to Tiburon across the Golden Gate Bridge and after that to a houseboat in Belvedere from where he continued to paint.  However, he also fell in with a heavy drinking crowd, which affected the quality of his work and caused him to fore-go his energetic plein-air painting treks.

Indicated by his painting, Desert Bridge, Holbrook, dated 1926, Gile traveled to Arizona where, according to author and gallery owner, Alfred Harrison, his subject was Holbrook, Arizona.   Several years later, according to Harrison, Gile was in Taos, New Mexico which resulted in his painting, Woman of Taos, dated 1931.  Further evidence of Gile being in Taos is his painting, Taos, New Mexico, dated 1924, which is in the collection of the Oakland Museum.

It is likely that Gile, who was Belvedere's only WPA mural commission artist during the Depression years, was in Taos with fellow painter, Maurice Logan.  They returned to the Southwest in 1934 according to a front page column of the Oakland Tribune February 21 of that year.

On June 8, 1947, Selden Gile died from alcoholism and is buried at the cemetery at Mt. Tamalpais, a site he loved to paint.

Sources:

Nancy Boas, Society of Six

Timothy Burgard, Ednah Root Curator of American Art (12/05/2006 email about Gile's painting in New Mexico and Arizona)

Timothy Burgard and Alfred Harrison, "California Landscapes from the Willrich Collection", American Art Review, 12/2006, p. 78

Michael and Genta Holmes, Art in the Residence of the American Ambassador, Australia (photo of Taos, New Mexico painting, 1924)

This biography from the Archives of AskART:
Born in Stow, Maine on March 20, 1877, Selden Gile, after attending business college in Maine, moved to California in 1901.  He was a payroll master in Lincoln and in Oakland after 1905 for Gladding McBean Company.

His art studies were under Perham Nahl, Frank Van Sloun, Spencer Macky, Wm H. Clapp, and at the California College of Arts and Crafts.  Prior to 1914, he painted in the manner of classical California landscape painters such as William Keith.  After that time he assumed the palette and style of Impressionism-Fauvism, but remained an "individualist" in his mode of expressing the California scene.

During the 1920s, he became the dominant figure in a group of painters known as the Society of Six.  The Six were active in the San Francisco Bay area and exhibited regularly at the Oakland Art Gallery.  In 1927 Gile moved across the Golden Gate to Tiburon and, shortly thereafter, to a houseboat in Belvedere.  Destitute and an alcoholic, he died at the poor farm in San Rafael, California on June 8, 1947 and was buried at Mt Tamalpais Cemetery.

Member:
Marin County Art Association; Oakland Art League.

Exhibitions:
San Francisco Art Association, 1916-35; Society of Six, 1923-28; Galerie Beaux Arts (SF), 1928 (solo); California Statewide (Santa Cruz), 1929 (prize); Vallejo Art Guild, 1929 (1st prize); Oakland Art Association, 1933-36; San Francisco Museum of Art Inaugural, 1935; Smithsonian Institution 1976-77; Oakland Museum, 1981.

In:
Monterey Peninsula Museum; Oakland Museum; Fleischer Museum (Scottsdale).
Source:
Edan Hughes, "Artists in California, 1786-1940"
Painters & Sculptors in California: the Modern Era; American Art Annual 1929-33; Who's Who in American Art 1936-41; Society of Six; Expo to Expo; Monterey: The Artist's View; A Feast for the Eyes; American Impressionism ; SF Chronicle, 11-10-1984.
Nearly 20,000 biographies can be found in Artists in California 1786-1940 by Edan Hughes and is available for sale ($150). For a full book description and order information please click here.

Biography from William A. Karges Fine Art - Carmel:
Selden Gile was born in Maine in 1877, where he attended business college.  After graduating, Gile moved out to California where he worked as payroll master for a large ranch.  Leaving that job, Gile moved to Oakland.

Largely a self-taught artist, Gile would spend most of his free time hiking and sketching the hills near Oakland and Berkeley.  Gile’s home became a meeting place for like-minded artists, and Gile’s hospitality was legendary.  Banding with five other artists, Gile would be a member of one of the finest and most unique painting groups California had ever seen.

Called “The Society of Six,” the group was devoted to a unique, modernist style of representation most reminiscent of the French Fauvists.  During the 1920’s the group hiked, painted, exhibited, and even lived together at times.  They were active together in the Bay Area from around 1918-1930.

Gile died in Marin County in 1947.

** If you discover credit omissions or have additional information to add, please let us know at registrar@AskART.com.

  go to top home | site map | site terms | AskART services & subscriptions | contact | about us
  copyright © 2000-2014 AskART all rights reserved ® AskART and Artists' Bluebook are registered trademarks

  A |  B |  C |  D-E |  F-G |  H |  I-K |  L |  M |  N-P |  Q-R |  S |  T-V |  W-Z  
  frequently searched artists 1, 2, more...  
  art appraisals, art for sale, auction records, misc artists