Artist Search
   
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z 

 Kenneth Noland  (1924 - 2010)

/ NOE-land/
About: Kenneth Noland
 

Summary

Examples of his work

 
 

Quick facts

Exhibits - current  
 

Biography*

Museums

 
 

Book references

Magazine references pre-2007

 
 

Discussion board

Signature Examples*

 
 
Buy and Sell: Kenneth Noland
 

For sale ads

Auction results*

 
 

Wanted ads

Auctions upcoming for him*  
 

Dealers

Auction sales graphs*

 
 

What's my art worth?

Magazine ads pre-1998*

 
 

Market Alert - Free

 
Lived/Active: New York/Maine/North Carolina      Known for: minimal-geometric, abstract expressionist painting

Login for full access
 
View AskART Services









*may require subscription
BIOGRAPHY for Kenneth Noland
Facts/Data
Birth
1924 (Ashville, North Carolina)
 
Death
2010 (Port Clyde, Maine)

Lived/Active
New York/Maine/North Carolina

   Share an Image of the Artist

Often Known For
minimal-geometric, abstract expressionist painting

Discussion Board
Would you like to discuss this artist?
AskART Discussion Boards
(0 Active)


Categories of Interest

Abstract Expressionism
Modernism
This biography from the Archives of AskART:
Following is the New York Times obituary of the artist:

Kenneth Noland, Abstract Painter of Brilliantly Colored Shapes, Dies at 85
 
By WILLIAM GRIMES
Published: January 6, 2010

Kenneth Noland, whose brilliantly colored concentric circles, chevrons and stripes were among the most recognized and admired signatures of the postwar style of abstraction known as Color Field painting, died Tuesday at his home in Port Clyde, Me. He was 85.  The cause was cancer, said his wife, Paige Rense, the editor in chief of Architectural Digest.

Mr. Noland arrived on the scene in the immediate aftermath of Abstract Expressionism.  A student of the geometric abstractionists Josef Albers and Ilya Bolotowsky, he found his way toward geometric forms that served as vessels for vibrant washes of color stained into the canvas.  In successive series of paintings, he introduced subtle changes into geometric forms that evolved from circles, chevrons, stripes and diamonds and back again to the circle late in his career.

In 1960 the highly influential critic Clement Greenberg proclaimed Mr. Noland and Morris Louis major figures in American art, the rightful successors to Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning.

Of Mr. Noland’s concentric-circle paintings, he wrote in Art International: “His color counts by its clarity and its energy; it is not there neutrally, to be carried by the design and drawing; it does the carrying itself.”

“He was one of the great colorists of the 20th century,” said the art critic Karen Wilkin, the author of a monograph on Mr. Noland. “Along with Morris Louis and Helen Frankenthaler, he invented a new kind of American abstraction based on the primacy of color. It had some of the philosophic underpinnings of Abstract Expressionism, but without the Sturm and Drang. He picked up where Matisse left off and moved painting into a new visual language.”

Kenneth Clifton Noland was born on April 10, 1924, in Asheville, N.C.  His father, a pathologist and Sunday painter, lent the boy his art materials after a visit to the National Gallery in Washington, where Kenneth, then 14, was awe-struck by the Monets.

He was drafted into the Army in 1942 and served in the Air Corps as a glider pilot and cryptographer. Toward the end of the war he was stationed in Egypt and Turkey.

After World War II he enrolled in Black Mountain College, an experimental school not far from his hometown. Albers’s quasi-scientific color theory dominated the painting curriculum, but Mr. Noland gravitated toward the less doctrinaire Bolotowsky and fell under the influence of Paul Klee, whose colorful surrealist fantasies loomed large in Mr. Noland’s first exhibition, at a Paris gallery in 1949.

In 1950 he married Cornelia Langer, a former student of the sculptor David Smith. The marriage ended in divorce, as did his second marriage, to Stephanie Gordon.  In addition to Ms. Rense, he is survived by two sons, William Noland of Durham, N.C., and Samuel Jesse Noland of Barnstable, Mass.; two daughters, Cady Noland and Lyn Noland both of Manhattan; a brother, Neil, also of Manhattan; and a grandchild.

Exposure to the work of Matisse in Paris profoundly affected Mr. Noland’s ideas about art and inspired him to develop what he called “color structure.” Returning to the United States, he settled in Washington, where he taught at the Institute of Contemporary Arts and the Catholic University of America, and became friends with the somewhat older Morris Louis, a fellow teacher at Washington Workshop Center of the Arts, an evening art school.

Both men, under the influence of Ms. Frankenthaler, began experimenting with stain technique, thinning their paint and applying it to unprimed canvas to create translucent layers of color that revealed the canvas surface. This approach dovetailed perfectly with Greenberg’s dictum that the destiny of painting, as it approached pure self-referentiality, was to become ever flatter.

Greenberg included him in his “Emerging Talent” exhibition at the Kootz Gallery in Manhattan in 1954, and his painting “In a Mist” (1955) was selected by Dorothy Miller for her traveling exhibition “Young American Painters,” organized for the Museum of Modern Art in 1956. In 1957 he was given his first one-man show, at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery.

Working on large canvases, Mr. Noland moved toward more geometric forms and harder edges in the late 1950s, initially exploring the emotional possibilities of color in concentric rings of varying width that seemed to pulsate toward the edges of the canvas.

In the early 1960s he began using ovoid shapes, and from there he progressed to chevrons, horizontal stripes and plaidlike arrangements of crisscrossing lines. In the late 1990s he returned to his early signature, the circle, this time painted on a colored ground. He also experimented with shaped canvases, often in a lozenge shape.

In 1963, after a year living in New York, he moved to a farm in South Shaftsbury, Vt., formerly owned by Robert Frost. There he entered into a close working relationship with the painter Jules Olitski and the British sculptor Anthony Caro, who taught at Bennington College nearby.

In 1977, the curator and art historian Diane Waldman organized a retrospective of Mr. Noland’s work at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Hilton Kramer, reviewing the show in The New York Times, called it “an immense bath of chromatic delights,” although he expressed reservations about what he saw as Mr. Noland’s odd combination of hot color and cool emotion.

He also zeroed in on Mr. Noland’s careerlong commitment to pure form and color. Regardless of the geometric form, he wrote, “Mr. Noland has been consistent and unvarying — not to say single-minded — in his artistic purpose, which has been to fill the canvas surface with a pictorial experience of pure color.”

With the rise of Pop Art, Minimalism and postmodernism Mr. Noland’s work, with its formalist rigor, fell out of critical favor. “Starting in the 1970s, there was a terrific reaction against Color Field painting and abstract art in general, which was in turn a rejection of Clement Greenberg,” said the art historian and critic Michael Fried, who organized the exhibition “Three American Painters: Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, Frank Stella” at the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard in 1965. “He remains a great painter.”

Mr. Noland continued to pursue his high modernist program, undeterred and confident about the future of abstract art. “It’s a fertile field that we barely have explored, and young artists will return to it,” he said at a symposium in 1994. “I’m certain.”


This biography from the Archives of AskART:
Kenneth Noland was born on April 10, 1924 in Asheville, North Carolina; his father was an amateur painter. He studied with Abstractionists Ilya Bolotowsky and Josef Albers at Black Mountain College. He was a member of the group of Color Field abstract painters promoted by the New York Times critic, Clement Greenberg. He taught at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, at Catholic University in Washington, D.C. and at Bennington College.

In 1963, Noland moved to South Shaftsbury, Vermont establishing close working relationships with Bennington College faculty member Paul Feeley, Jules Olitski and Anthony Caro. Dubbed the "Green Mountain Boys" by Vogue  in 1966, the four abstract artists helped put the college on the map as a visual arts mecca.

He rarely painted on canvases smaller than 4 ft. by 4 ft. His choices range from mural size to mere slivers, from having the standard four sides to irregularly shaped profiles, from stained surfaces to thickly textured ones. Yet he did not want machinelike perfection; he deliberately left the splatter of orange on yellow in one of his paintings. He dared to parallel magenta, russet, beige and maroon and other combinations of color in a lollipop war of taste. His most striking contribution to the art of the 1960s was his mastery of color.

Noland and his wife, art historian Peggy Schiffer, lived north of Manhattan in a large, white, clapboard house with spreading grounds and a sculpture garden. He worked in a red barn on the property. He redesigned the space to make room for many related activities, among them the rag paper he made by hand in the basement.

Written and submitted by Jean Ershler Schatz, artist and researcher from Laguna Woods, California.

Sources include:
Time Magazine, January 8, 1965
R.H. Love in ARTnews, November 1986
Architectural Digest Visits Kenneth Noland by Phyllis Tuchman
Mark Stevens in Newsweek, May 16, 1977
Temple Fielding's Dictionary of American Painters, Sculptors and Engravers, 1986-87
Bennington College

Biography from Hollis Taggart Galleries (Artists, P-R):

Kenneth Noland (b. 1924)

Born and raised in Asheville, North Carolina, in 1924, Kenneth Noland is best known as a pioneering member of the group termed Color Field painters by art critic Clement Greenburg.  As a young man in the 1940s, Noland served in the Air Force as a glider pilot and cryptographer.  With the assistance of the G.I. Bill, he studied art at Black Mountain College, near his childhood home. The school developed a reputation as an outpost of European modernist sensibility and a training ground for abstract painters.  Noland's influential teachers included Josef Albers and especially Ilya Bolotowsky.  As a student, Noland committed himself to abstract painting, but he recognized a need to break, at least temporarily, from the hard-edged geometric abstraction rooted in the Bauhaus and work by Mondrian that permeated the Black Mountain College.

In 1948 Noland left for a year of study in Paris.  He developed an appreciation for the way preeminent colorist Henri Matisse displayed mastery of paint, later commenting "To paint out of Matisse, or to use color, you had to learn how to use the materials."(1)  This preoccupation with the formal properties of his chosen materials would become a defining characteristic of Noland's career. While abroad, Noland also became interested in the emotional and symbolic qualities of Paul Klee's painting.  When Noland returned to the United States, he settled near family and began teaching art in Washington, D.C.  In the late 1940s and early 1950s, Noland's work typically incorporated a selection of recognizable symbols – as in this untitled painting – revealing the influence of Klee as well as of early work by Jackson Pollock.  At this time, Noland's technique involved building paint up in thick layers on the ground.

Within a few years, Noland’s style changed dramatically, a development closely linked to his friendship with fellow abstract artist Morris Louis, whom Noland met in 1952.  Inspired by their shared passion for color and prompted by seeing poured stain paintings in Helen Frankenthaler's studio during a trip to New York in 1953, the two artists began collaborating on series of "jam paintings."  These experiments in soaking large, unstretched canvases with diluted acrylic paint set new directions for each artist's oeuvre when they returned to working independently.  For Noland, the dynamics of color became the primary subject matter of his painting.

Although Noland began showing his work in New York in 1956, he has worked in the orbit of the New York art world, intentionally keeping himself apart at homes in Washington, D.C. and New England, except for a brief period in the early 1960s.  In addition to painting prolifically and usually in series—notably circle paintings, then chevrons, then stripes, then circles again—Noland has had a long career as a teacher at institutions including Catholic University and Bennington College.  His work has been the subject of a mid-career retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and is included in the collections of museums worldwide.

1. Kenneth Noland, interview with Paul Cummings (1971), quoted in Kenworth Moffett, Kenneth Noland (New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1977), p. 19.


Biography from Hollis Taggart Galleries (Artists, E-O):
Born and raised in Asheville, North Carolina, in 1924, Kenneth Noland is best known as a pioneering member of the group termed Color Field painters by art critic Clement Greenburg. As a young man in the 1940s, Noland served in the Air Force as a glider pilot and cryptographer. With the assistance of the G.I. Bill, he studied art at Black Mountain College, near his childhood home. The school developed a reputation as an outpost of European modernist sensibility and a training ground for abstract painters. Noland’s influential teachers included Josef Albers and especially Ilya Bolotowsky. As a student, Noland committed himself to abstract painting, but he recognized a need to break, at least temporarily, from the hard-edged geometric abstraction rooted in the Bauhaus and work by Mondrian that permeated the Black Mountain College.

In 1948 Noland left for a year of study in Paris. He developed an appreciation for the way preeminent colorist Henri Matisse displayed mastery of paint, later commenting “To paint out of Matisse, or to use color, you had to learn how to use the materials."(1) This preoccupation with the formal properties of his chosen materials would become a defining characteristic of Noland’s career. While abroad, Noland also became interested in the emotional and symbolic qualities of Paul Klee’s painting. When Noland returned to the United States, he settled near family and began teaching art in Washington, D.C. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, Noland’s work typically incorporated a selection of recognizable symbols – as in this untitled painting – revealing the influence of Klee as well as of early work by Jackson Pollock. At this time, Noland’s technique involved building paint up in thick layers on the ground.

Within a few years, Noland’s style changed dramatically, a development closely linked to his friendship with fellow abstract artist Morris Louis, whom Noland met in 1952. Inspired by their shared passion for color and prompted by seeing poured stain paintings in Helen Frankenthaler’s studio during a trip to New York in 1953, the two artists began collaborating on series of “jam paintings.” These experiments in soaking large, unstretched canvases with diluted acrylic paint set new directions for each artist’s oeuvre when they returned to working independently. For Noland, the dynamics of color became the primary subject matter of his painting.

Although Noland began showing his work in New York in 1956, he has worked in the orbit of the New York art world, intentionally keeping himself apart at homes in Washington, D.C. and New England, except for a brief period in the early 1960s. In addition to painting prolifically and usually in series—notably circle paintings, then chevrons, then stripes, then circles again—Noland has had a long career as a teacher at institutions including Catholic University and Bennington College. His work has been the subject of a mid-career retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and is included in the collections of museums worldwide.

1. Kenneth Noland, interview with Paul Cummings (1971), quoted in Kenworth Moffett, "Kenneth Noland" (New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1977), p. 19.

© Copyright 2008 Hollis Taggart Galleries

** If you discover credit omissions or have additional information to add, please let us know at registrar@AskART.com.

  go to top home | site map | site terms | AskART services & subscriptions | contact | about us
  copyright © 2000-2014 AskART all rights reserved ® AskART and Artists' Bluebook are registered trademarks

  A |  B |  C |  D-E |  F-G |  H |  I-K |  L |  M |  N-P |  Q-R |  S |  T-V |  W-Z  
  frequently searched artists 1, 2, more...  
  art appraisals, art for sale, auction records, misc artists