Find, Learn, Price Art
Enjoy the comprehensive art database we've compiled since 1987
Membership Details
Images, sales charts, bios, signatures, 30 artist Alerts and more ...
Art auction records:  Millions of references for pricing research
Or, register for Free Alerts
To track 10 artists.

Already a member?  Sign in here

Robert Philipp

 (1895 - 1981)
Robert Philipp was active/lived in New York.  Robert Philipp is known for figure, portrait, genre, landscape painting, teaching.

Biography  
Robert Philipp


Biography from the Archives of askART

Robert Philipp (1895 - 1981)

Robert Philipp was born Moses Solomon Philipp on February 2, 1895 in New York City.  He showed early talent and grew up in a family atmosphere that fed and cultivated his creativity.  At age of 15, he entered the Art Students League for four years and then continued his training at the National Academy of Design.  His teachers at the League included George Bridgeman and Frank DuMond, and at the National Academy he studied with Douglas Volk and George Willoughby Maynard.

Recognition cam quickly to Philipp, and his early works exhibit an eclectic range of artistic sources: Vermeer, Rembrandt, Renoir, Bonnard, Sargent and Fantin-Latour.  After the death of his father, Philipp turned away from painting for a time and joined his uncle's opera company as a tenor.  He eventually returned to painting and settled in Paris, living there in the 1920s.  The exact date of Paris sojourn is not known, but he reportedly lived there for ten years, supporting himself through the sale of his paintings.

Back in New York in the early 1930s, Philipp was gaining a reputation for his portraits and figure studies.  His - Olympia - won the Logan prize at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1936 and was subsequently purchase by J. Paul Getty.  During the Depression, he worked for the Public Works of Arts Project.

In 1934, he married artist Shelly (Rochelle) Post, who became his favorite model until her death in 1971.  Critic Henry McBride called Philipp "One of the top ten painters in America."  It was during the 1930s that he began to paint landscapes, still lives and nudes evolving a distinctively lyric and modern style.

Philipp painted passionately and directly creating a synthesis of observation and poetic vision using high keyed colors and rhythmic treatment of form.  Philipp's work, in his later years, began to increasingly resemble the Expressionist and emotional style of Chaim Soutine.

Philipp, as a teacher at the Art Students League for over thirty years and at the National Academy for sixteen years, was an important influence on American art.  As a teacher, he was well known for his attention to color and his constant emphasis on the importance of drawing.  He was a member of the Lotus Club, National Academy of Design and Royal Society of Arts.

His works are in the collections of the Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D.C.; High Museum, Atlanta, Georgia; Dallas Museum, Texas; Metropolitan Museum of Art and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City.

Sources include:
Biography attached to the back of an original oil painting by Robert Philipp.

Information provided by Arlene Lachman, Lachman Gallery



Biography from the Archives of askART
Robert Philipp, painter and etcher was born February 2nd, 1895 in New York City.  He studied at the Art Students' League with Frank Vincent DuMond and George Bridgman from 1910 to 1914. He also studied at the National Academy of Design with Volk and Maynard from 1914 to 1917.

Philipp's greatest critic, Philipp himself, said "The excitement of creating a picture never leaves me.  It becomes more and more a delirium.  Sometimes while painting, I awaken to the fact that I have gone through a subconscious experience.  I find myself painting the visible, yet with a subjectiveness which changes reality into something transferred from an inner eye. I find myself using patterns, lines, and dimensions that I see in the visible and that come through the invisible. I know that my reality is not realism but my perspective of it, and a commentary upon it. The past, the present, and the future, become a blend.  Only the essences within nature are the catalysts and the combinations that draw from me the reflections or them,-of me, and through me, as an instrument." (Robert Philipp, 1970)

Philipp painted a wide range of subjects that included genre, portraits, Holland, Paris, bars, nudes, clowns, flowers and coasts.  His style employed an often-unusual use of color that although different, seemed intriguing and appropriate to the composition.  He favored subjects of leisure often depicting scenes such as ladies in a balcony enjoying a show, girls in interiors reading, a night out, a stroll in the park... Although often overlooked by art scholars today, Philipp was universally appreciated during his lifetime.  He conveyed his subjects with a certain sensitivity and understanding that his viewers could relate to.

Philipp taught at the High Museum of Art, 1946; University of Illinois, 1940; Art Students' League of New York and the National Academy of design.  He was also elected an associate of the National Academy and later full Academician of the National Academy of Design.  He won numerous awards during his life including the third Hallgarten Prize, 1922; prizes from the National Academy of Design, 1947 and 1951; Laguna Beach Art Association prize; medal prize, Art Institute of Chicago, 1936;  IBM, 1939; bronze medal, Allied Artists of America, 1958 and others. Robert Philipp passed away in 1981.

Source:
Blake Benton Fine Art


Biography from the Archives of askART
Robert Philipp was born on February 2, 1895 in New York City. He received his training at the Art Students League with Frank Vincent DuMond and George Bridgman from 1910 to 1914. He also studied at the National Academy of Design with Volk and Maynard from 1914 to 1917.

As a boy he lived in a world of musical comedies; his father and his uncle wrote and produced many hits and his paintings with its gay scenes and lovely girls, shows the influence of this pleasant background. He spent time in training in music with an eye in the direction of the grand opera stage. He even spent a year or so in a leading role in one of his father's productions. Then he made a decision to abandon the stage and devote himself entirely to painting.

Although often overlooked by art scholars today, Philipp was universally appreciated during his lifetime. He conveyed his subjects with a certain sensitivity and understanding that his viewers could relate to. He was a portrait, figure and still life painter; he painted celebrities, nudes, even landscapes. He often used his wife, Shelby Post, as a model.

Philipp taught at the High Museum of Art in 1946, the University of Illinois in 1940, the Art Students League from 1948 to 1973 and the National Academy of Design from 1950 to 1975.  He died in 1981.


Sources include:
Life Magazine (date unknown)
From the Internet, AskART.com

Written and submitted by Jean Ershler Schatz, artist and researcher form Laguna Woods, California.


Biography from the Archives of askART
Robert Philipp found success and recognition early on in his career.  He was a portrait, figure and still-life painter.  He painted celebrities, also landscapes, and nudes.  He often used his wife, Shelby Post, as a model in his paintings.

His concepts and teaching methods provided inspiration to a number of students whom he taught at The Art Students League in New York from 1948 to 1973 and at the National Academy of Design from 1950 to 1975.

His work is featured in the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Whitney Museum in New York.

Sources include:

Peter Falk, Who Was Who in American Art

Grand Central Art Galleries, Inc., 1985


Biography from Papillon Gallery
Robert Philipp
1895-1981

Robert Philipp was born on February 2, 1895 in New York City. His name at birth was Moses Soloman Philipp. His father was born in Hamburg, Germany; he was a painter in England before moving to New York. His mother was Hungarian.

He studied with Frank Vincent DuMond and George Bridgman at the Art Students League; between 1914-1917 he studied with Volk and Maynard at the National Academy of Design. Art historians believed that he lived in Paris for ten years; unfortunately the dates of his sojourn are unknown. It is thought that he supported himself in Paris by selling paintings. He had also been a relatively successful tenor in his uncle's opera company.

Philipp has been called "America's Last Impressionist." He painted diverse subject matter, genre scenes, clowns, flowers, portraits, and costal areas. He also painted scenes of the Netherlands and Paris.

Philipp received numerous awards for his paintings. In 1922 he won the third Hallgarten prize and in 1936 he won awards from the Art Institute of Chicago and Laguna Beach Art Association. He won a silver medal at the 1937 Carnegie Institute's International Exhibition. Two years later in 1939 he won an award from IBM. He was awarded prizes from the National Academy of Design in 1947 and 1951. In 1958 he won a third place medal from the Allied Artists of America.

Philipp's work is included in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Dallas Museum of Art, and Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

In addition to a successful professional career, Philipp also had a distinguished teaching career. During the forties, Philipp taught at the High Museum of Art, University of Illinois, Art Students League of New York, and National Academy of Design. Philipp was elected an associate of the National Academy of Design in 1935 and a full-member in 1945.

The Impressionists, particularly Renoir, influenced Philipp's style. His early work had a more deliberate brush stroke and deeper color palate. As his career gained momentum, the commercial audience more and more determined Philipp's compositions and subject matter.

Philipp died in New York City in 1981.

In 1985 a large retrospective of Philipp's work was organized by the Grand Central Galleries in association with the Art Students League of New York. The exhibition included eighty paintings spanning his sixty year career.


** If you discover credit omissions or have additional information to add, please let us know at registrar@askart.com.

Share an image of the Artist images@askart.com.


•  Access to full biographies
•  Every Friday (in the U.S.)
    Learn more ...
Self-portrait




About  Robert Philipp

Born:  1895 - New York City
Died:   1981 - New York City
Known for:  figure, portrait, genre, landscape painting, teaching