Find, Learn, Price Art
Enjoy the comprehensive art database we've compiled since 1987
Membership Details
Images, sales charts, bios, signatures, 30 artist Alerts and more ...
Art auction records:  Millions of references for pricing research
Or, register for Free Alerts
To track 10 artists.

Already a member?  Sign in here

Charles Cole

 (1814 - 1858)
Charles Octavius Cole was active/lived in Maine, Massachusetts.  Charles Cole is known for portrait and landscape painting.

Charles Cole

    KOLE    click to hear

Biography from the Archives of askART

Known mainly as a portrait painter, Charles Octavius Cole also produced some landscape paintings, some of which were painted in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

Cole worked in New Orleans, Louisiana from 1838 to 1842, and then settled in Portland, Maine where he remained at least until 1856. In 1850 his household was known to have included his wife, Marie, and three children (2 months to 11 years). He and his brother, Joseph Greenleaf Cole, were active portraitists in Portland during the first half of the nineteenth century, although the major painters in that area were the landscape painters.

A student of Charles Coles was John Bradley Hudson, Jr. Hudson and Harrison Bird Brown became the two major Portland representatives of the mid-nineteenth century realistic landscape aesthetic that was associated with the Hudson River School. Another student of Coles was Charles Frederick Kimball, who became known for a more subjective manner of scenic painting, which reflected the growing popularity in America of the French Barbizon art.

Though it is thought that he died in 1858, one of his paintings was exhibited at the Brooklyn Art Association in 1877, presumably posthumously.

** If you discover credit omissions or have additional information to add, please let us know at

Share an image of the Artist

  Full access to biographies is
  free each Friday

About  Charles Cole

Born:  1814 - Newburyport, Massachusetts
Died:   1858
Known for:  portrait and landscape painting