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 George Caleb Bingham  (1811 - 1879)

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Lived/Active: Missouri/Kansas      Known for: street-riverine genre and portrait painting

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George Caleb Bingham
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This biography from the Archives of AskART:
The following exhibition review is from The Kansas City Star, September 8, 2013, and refers to an exhibition at the Jackson County Historical Society. 

By BRIAN BURNES
The Kansas City Star

Three judges can be found on the second floor of the renovated Jackson County Truman Courthouse in Independence.

That wouldn’t be unusual, except for the way the judges gaze upon visitors — steady, unmoving and frozen on canvas.

Turns out all three judges sat for 19th century Missouri artist George Caleb Bingham. Now their portraits hang on a wall of the new Jackson County Museum of Art, opening Saturday in the recently renovated courthouse, not far from the offices of the county’s assessments and collections departments.

Many of the 27 Bingham artworks displayed are owned by Ken McClain, Independence lawyer and developer.

“Bingham is recognized as a national treasure, but his Jackson County roots are not focused on that frequently,” McClain said of the artist, who maintained a studio in his Independence home, later served as a Kansas City police commissioner and is buried in Union Cemetery.

“I thought the courthouse would be an appropriate place for a museum dedicated to him.”

Jackson County Executive Mike Sanders worked with McClain to set aside during courthouse renovations several second-floor rooms that have been transformed into a gallery.

Ceiling-mounted pendant lamps that recall the courthouse’s 1933 renovation now hang alongside track lighting. Long blinds have been installed in the building’s tall window frames to protect the paintings, some of them about 150 years old.

“Ken’s vision has moved the courthouse renovation from a great project to an incredible one, increasing its value exponentially,” Sanders said. “Visitors will come here from all over the country.”

The Bingham artworks make up the principal holdings of the nonprofit museum, which will be administered by its own board of directors. Other works are on loan from the State Historical Society of Missouri and the Jackson County Historical Society.

McClain hopes that future acquisitions, as well as other loaned artworks, can be rotated through the holdings.

Bingham began painting about 1830. Although his reputation today may rest on paintings such as The Jolly Flatboatmen and The County Election, Bingham often earned his living by painting portraits.

McClain started collecting Bingham portraits about eight years ago. A painting of Samuel Locke Sawyer, a 19th century Jackson County lawyer and judge, was one of his first acquisitions. Now that portrait hangs just inside the museum’s door alongside portraits of Missouri judges Francis Marion Black and Priestly Haggin McBride.

But McClain sought out more Bingham portraits, especially those that had been handed down by generations, not always receiving the best of care.

Patricia Moss, a Washington state fine arts investigator who grew up in Kansas City, helped McClain track down a Bingham portrait of Thomas Hoyle Mastin, a 19th-century Kansas City banker who also was an investor in The Kansas City Times.

When Moss found the portrait in 2007, it had been hanging in a Texas Gulf Coast antique shop operated by the wife of a family descendant and her business partner.

The business partner hadn’t liked the painting and had at some point taken it down and moved it to a storeroom. But the neglect had not ended there.

“The painting had been used as a table, good side up,” said Moss.

The weight of various objects on the canvas resulted in a prominent gash in the portrait’s lower left-hand corner. Alerted by Moss, McClain acquired the torn and sagging portrait.

“The owners felt terrible about what had happened,” Moss said.

“They were happy to sell the painting and know that it would get the care that it deserved.”

A Minneapolis conservator restored the Mastin portrait. Today it hangs in the new museum, accompanied by before-and-after images that illustrate the painting’s rescue and restoration.
Another Bingham painting located by Moss is an 1850s portrait of James Sidney Rollins, a 19th-century politician who helped establish the University of Missouri. The painting had been owned by a family descendant who didn’t know who had painted it.

“Generations of a family die off, and sometimes people just forget,” said Moss.

Although the Mastin portrait long had been acknowledged as a Bingham, Moss collected the opinions of other area experts on the Rollins canvas. After a consensus emerged that Bingham had rendered it, McClain acquired that canvas as well.

By pursuing the preservation and public display of these Bingham originals, McClain said he is fulfilling the wishes of an artist who believed the appreciation of fine art need not be reserved for those who can afford to own it.

“Bingham’s paintings need to be seen, not be hidden away in basements,” he said.

Courtesy, Patricia Moss, who is referenced above.

------------

This entry was posted in Art Detectives, George Caleb Bingham

Opening an Exhibit in a New Museum

Posted on September 10, 2013 by Patricia Moss

First we were obsessed.  Then we were interrupted.  In the middle of explaining our work with the Lincolns, we were asked to curate the opening exhibit of the new Jackson County Art Museum in the renovated “Truman” courthouse at the center of the square in Independence, Missouri.  We were contacted in mid-July.  The dedication was scheduled for Saturday, September 7.  The normal time-frame to create an exhibit is a year and a half.  Pat was asked to accomplish the task in a month and a half.  To write about the experience, Pat changes the blog format to photo-informal and the voice to first-person.

After a flurry of initial planning, I traveled to Independence, Missouri.  I needed to see the empty space that would become the museum.  The courthouse at the center of the town square was still under renovation, so the graphic designer, Erica Williams of Primary Colors Gallery, and I had to wear hard hats.

I brought with me 8 1/2 x 11 inch glossy photographs, captioned with framed measurements,of the artworks that would fill the museum - primarily the Kenneth B. and Cynthia McClain George Caleb Bingham Collection. Jackson County officials had sent me blueprints, but only being in the space makes the process organic.  Erica and I each had independently thought about making actual size paper cuts, but there simply wasn’t time.  I scattered the photos in their sheet protectors throughout the rooms and refined my plan.  Erica took careful measurements to determine the size of display panels and labels in relation to the artworks.

The collectors and county officials approved the plan and I returned to my home in the Northwest to write the interpretation, George Caleb Bingham: Witness to History, which is a 21st century re-assessment of the artist.  Erica began the design of the display panels.

Every morning there were questions to be answered, such as insurance or cleaning procedures. By late morning I could settle into write.  To quote Nathaniel Hawthorne, “Easy reading is damn hard writing.”  My friend Alisha Cole of Arcadia Consulting helped clarify my thoughts. She read every word and proved, once again, to be invaluable. She helped me push through the wall of terror of “It’s all horrible and I’m out of time!” and actually finish.

Communications staff at Jackson County had agreed to edit the finished text. They performed the task with lightning speed.  I made their changes and emailed the pages of text to Erica.  She worked around the clock to get the designed panels and labels to the printers by their deadline.  I packed and returned to Missouri.

The day after Labor Day Erica and I met at the courthouse.  Workmen were still everywhere.

In no time at all the art handlers from ArtWorks of Kansas City arrived with the McClain Collection in strong boxes.

As the art handlers and I worked to hang the paintings, Erica marked where display panels should be hung first with chalk, and then with painter’s tape at the corners and sides.  Joan Stack and Greig Thompson arrived from Columbia, Missouri, with five loans from the State Historical Society of Missouri.  The loan from Jackson County Historical Society appeared.

The paintings were hung.  But the printers had not met their deadline.  Text would not arrive until Friday morning — the day set for the gala opening.   Still the paintings and engravings were hung.

The printing issue was only the first of a myriad of problems – all within normal limits.  The lighting was too bright but the art handlers did a fine job of creating the reverential feeling I wanted.  One of the artworks needed an emergency repair.  Humidity had funneled a mat.  Ken McClain’s paralegal Amber McCarty could have a second career as a cat burglar; she checked, double-checked, triple and quadruple-checked the security system.  The Jackson County Art Museum is secure.  There was a communication problem over how to display a small piece as I wanted: upright in a vitrine with both the front and back visible.  On the back of the painting is a sketch that shows how much Bingham’s cabinetmaking apprenticeship influenced his composition.  I spent an evening figuring out how to keep the artwork safely vertical.  At the hardware store I bought 10 feet of molding – the smallest amount possible – and had the associate cut two pieces the width of the frame.  The next day Erica suggested she paint the pieces black.  With a healthy quantity of museum wax, the small painting was braced by the molding.

As we continued to work, the courthouse was readied for its re-dedication on Saturday, September 7, 2013,  at 2:00 pm, 80 years to the hour that County Commissioner Harry S. Truman dedicated the original construction.

After the printer finally arrived Friday morning, he and Erica placed the panels and labels on the walls.  I erased chalk marks with a rag.


This biography from the Archives of AskART:
Born in Augusta County, Virginia in the Shenandoah River Valley, George Caleb Bingham became known for classically rendered western genre, especially Missouri and Mississippi River scenes of boatmen bringing cargo to the American West and politicians seeking to influence frontier life.  One of his most famous river genre paintings was The Jolly Flatboatmen, 1846.  The first version of this painting is in the Manoogian Collection at the National Gallery of Art.  Fame resulted for this work when it was exhibited in New York at the American Art Union, whose organizers made an engraving of 10,000 copies and distributed it to all of their members.  Paintings such as Country Politician (1849) and County Election (1852) and Stump Speaking (1854) reflected Bingham's political interests.

In 1819, as an eight-year old, he moved to Boon's Lick, Missouri with his parents and grandfather who had been farmers and millers in the Shenandoah Valley near Rockingham, Virginia.  Reportedly as a child there, he took every opportunity to escape supervision to travel the River and watch the marine activity.

His father died in 1823, when his son was 12 years old. His mother had encouraged his art talent, but art lessons were not easily obtainable.  In order to earn money, he apprenticed to a cabinet maker but determined to become an artist. By 1835, he had a modest reputation as a frontier painter and successfully charged twenty dollars per portrait in St. Louis. "His portraits had become standard decorations in prosperous Missouri homes." (Samuels 46).  In 1836, he moved to Natchez, Mississippi and there had the same kind of career, only was able to charge forty dollars per portrait.

He remained largely self taught until 1837, when he, age 26 and using the proceeds from his portraiture, studied several months at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.  He later said that he learned much of his atmospheric style and classically balanced composition by copying paintings in collections in St. Louis and Philadelphia and that among his most admired painters were Thomas Cole, John Vanderlyn, and William Sidney Mount. Between 1856 and 1859, Bingham traveled back and forth to Dusseldorf, Germany, where he studied the work of genre painters. Some critics think these influences were negative on his work because during that time period, he abandoned his luminist style that had brought him so much public affirmation.

Bingham credited Chester Harding (1792-1866) as being the earliest and one of the most lasting influences on his work.  Harding, a leading portraitist when Bingham was a young man, had a studio in Franklin, near Bingham's home town.  In 1822, when Bingham was ten years old, he watched Harding finish a portrait of Daniel Boone.  Bingham recalled that watching Harding with the Boone portrait was a lasting inspiration and that it was the first time he had ever seen a painting in progress.  Harding suggested to Bingham that he begin doing portraiture by finding subjects in the river men, which, of course, opened the subject matter that established fame and financial success for Bingham.  Harding also encouraged Bingham to copy with paint engravings.  He later painted two portraits of Boone but, contrary to the assertions of some scholars, he did not do Boone portraits in the company of Harding.

Bingham's portraits of Boone are not located, but one of them, a wood signboard for a hotel in Boonville circa 1828 to 1830, showed a likeness of Boone in buckskin dress with his gun and inscription "Daniel Boone/Liberty".  It is possible this image was based on an engraving by James Otto Lewis after a design by Chester Harding published in St. Louis in 1820 (Bloch) and that this similarity accounts for the stories that Bingham and Harding painted together.

From 1840 to 1844, Bingham was based in Washington DC where he painted portraits of prominent citizens, but he failed to achieve much recognition until he returned to Missouri in 1844 and began painting river genre works from a studio in St. Louis.  Among the first notable paintings of his signature subject was Fur Traders Descending the Missouri (1845).

At the same time, Bingham was creative artistically, he was running for state office. He was a member of the Whig party, founded in 1834 as a coalition opposed to Andrew Jackson, who was then U.S. President.  Bingham's close friend and influential Missouri Whig, James Sidney Rollins, drew him into politics, and Bingham gave speeches for presidential candidate William Henry Harrison.  In 1846, Bingham was elected to the state legislature, but the election was contested, and Bingham lost the office. In 1862, he was appointed state treasurer and in 1875, Adjutant General.  Two years later, he accepted a professorship at the University of Missouri at Columbia, a position he held for only two years because he died in 1879.

In 1872, he  visited Colorado, where he did a painting of Pike's Peak, View of Pike's Peak, now in the Amon Carter Museum.  In 1878, he returned to Colorado.

Bingham was described as small and delicate but dynamic, an excellent conversationalist married three times (Samuels 46).  He always wore a wig because he had "contracted varioloid, a mild form of small pox at age 24 in 1834-35 and lost his hair.  Thereafter he wore a wig, which is first seen in his earliest known self portrait." (Bloch/Kline)

Sources:

Michael David Zellman, 300 Years of American Art

E Maurice Bloch, Catalogue Raisonne of George Caleb Bingham. Citing Bloch as a reference,

Fred R. Kline, fine-art professional of Santa Fe, New Mexico submitted the information regarding Bingham and Daniel Boone portraits and smallpox.

Peter Hastings Falk, Editor, Who Was Who in American Art

Peggy and Harold Samuels, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Artists of the American West

Submitted by Patricia Moss, Fine Art Investigations, Long Beach, Washington

For information on the likely prototype for Bingham's painting, Jolly Flatboatmen in Port, see the Patricia Moss AskART biography of William Morrison Hughes (1818-1892)

This biography from the Archives of AskART:
Born in Augusta County, Virginia in the Shenandoah River Valley, George Caleb Bingham became known for classically rendered western genre, especially Missouri and Mississippi River scenes of boatmen bringing cargo to the American West and politicians seeking to influence frontier life.  One of his most famous river genre paintings was The Jolly Flatboatmen completed in several versions in 1846. This first version of this painting is in the Manoogian Collection at the National Gallery of Art.  Fame resulted for this work when it was exhibited in New York at the American Art Union whose organizers made an engraving of 10,000 copies and distributed it to all of their members.  Paintings such as Country Politician (1849) and County Election (1852) and Stump Speaking (1854) reflected Bingham's political interests.

In 1819, as an eight-year old, he moved to Boon's Lick, Missouri with his parents and grandfather who had been farmers and inn keepers in the Shenandoah Valley near Rockingham, Virginia.  Reportedly as a child there, he took every opportunity to escape supervision to travel the River and watch the marine activity.

His father died in 1827, when his son was sixteen years old.  His mother had encouraged his art talent, but art lessons were not easily obtainable.  In order to earn money, he apprenticed to a cabinet maker but determined to become an artist.  By 1835, he had a modest reputation as a frontier painter and successfully charged twenty dollars per portrait in St. Louis.  "His portraits had become standard decorations in prosperous Missouri homes." (Samuels 46).  In 1836, he moved to Natchez, Mississippi and there had the same kind of career, only was able to charge forty dollars per portrait.

He remained largely self taught until 1837, when he, age 26 and using the proceeds from his portraiture, studied several months at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.  He later said that he learned much of his atmospheric style and classically balanced composition by copying paintings in collections in St. Louis and Philadelphia and that among his most admired painters were Thomas Cole, John Vanderlyn, and William Sidney Mount.  Between 1856 and 1859, Bingham traveled back and forth to Dusseldorf, Germany, where he studied the work of genre painters. Some critics think these influences were negative on his work because during that time period, he abandoned his luminist style that had brought him so much public affirmation.

Bingham credited Chester Harding (1792-1866) as being the earliest and one of the most lasting influences on his work.  Harding,a leading portraitists when Bingham was a young man, had a studio in Franklin, near Bingham's home town.  In 1822, when Bingham was ten years old, he watched Harding finish a portrait of Daniel Boone.  Bingham recalled that watching Harding with the Boone portrait was a lasting inspiration and that it was the first time he had ever seen a painting in progress.  Harding suggested to Bingham that he begin doing portraiture by finding subjects in the river men, which, of course, opened the subject matter that established fame and financial success for Bingham.  Harding also encouraged Bingham to copy with paint engravings.  He later painted two portraits of Boone but, contrary to the assertions of some scholars, he did not do Boone portraits in the company of Harding.

Bingham's portraits of Boone are not located, but one of them, a wood signboard for a hotel in Boonville circa 1828 to 1830, showed a likeness of Boone in buckskin dress with his gun and inscription "Daniel Boone/Liberty".  It is possible this image was based on an engraving by James Otto Lewis after a design by Chester Harding published in St. Louis in 1820 (Bloch) and that this similarity accounts for the stories that Bingham and Harding painted together.

From 1840 to 1844, Bingham was based in Washington DC where he painted portraits of prominent citizens, but he failed to achieve much recognition until he returned to Missouri in 1844 and began painting river genre works from a studio in St. Louis.  Among the first notable paintings of his signature subject was Fur Traders Descending the Missouri (1845).

At the same time, Bingham was creative artistically, he was running for state office. He was a member of the Whig party, founded in 1834 as a coalition opposed to Andrew Jackson, who was then U.S. President.  Bingham's close friend and influential Missouri Whig, James Sidney Rollins, drew him into politics, and Bingham gave speeches for presidential candidate William Henry Harrison.  In 1846, Bingham was elected to the state legislature, but the election was contested and Bingham lost the office. In 1862, he was elected state treasurer and in 1875, Adjutant General.  Two years later, he accepted a professorship at the University of Missouri at Columbia, a position he held for only two years because he died in 1879.

However, during these last years, he had done some traveling to Europe and in 1872 visited Colorado, where he did a painting of Pike's Peak, View of Pike's Peak, now in the Amon Carter Museum.  In 1878, he returned to Colorado.

"Bingham was described as small and delicate but dynamic, an excellent conversationalist married three times (Samuels 46).  He always wore a wig because he had "contracted smallpox at age 24 in 1834-35 and lost his hair.  Thereafter he wore a wig, which is first seen in his earliest known self portrait." (Bloch/Kline)

Sources:
Michael David Zellman, "300 Years of American Art"

E Maurice Bloch, Catalogue Raisonne of George Caleb Bingham. Citing Bloch as a reference, Fred R. Kline, fine-art professional of Santa Fe, New Mexico submitted the information regarding Bingham and Daniel Boone portraits and smallpox.

Peter Falk, Who Was Who in American Art

Peggy and Harold Samuels, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Artists of the American West

Nancy Heugh, Paper Conservator, Saint Louis Art Museum (Collection information on the 1846 version of Jolly Flatboatmen)

Biography from Fred R. Kline Gallery, Inc.:
"George Caleb Bingham: Artist of Missouri and the American Frontier" Abridged Version Copyright 2005 by Fred R. Kline, Kline Art Research Associates & Fred R. Kline Gallery.

George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879) is renowned today as one of the classic artists of the American West; he was also the first notable American artist to have been born in the West. His paintings rank among the nation’s greatest 19th c. art treasures. Bingham is best known for his genre scenes derived from the daily life of what was then the Western frontier. Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery had returned from their 1804-06 westward exploration only five years before Bingham was born. In 1820, when Bingham was nine, Missouri became the 24th state. Bingham’s paintings from 1845-55—the decade of his best work—generally relate to life and commerce along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, and to the American scene involving the people of Missouri in and around St. Louis, Columbia, Jefferson City, Arrow Rock, Boonville, and Kansas City.

His genre paintings—narratives of everyday life in Missouri—depicted and immortalized the common man: Fur traders and riverboatmen and settlers in scenes of frontier life (which he knew from both tradition and first hand observation); and scenes of the young nation’s democratic process: Political campaigning and elections (which he knew from his deep involvement with the Whig party, with Missouri state politics and national politics, and as a seeker and achiever of political office).

Further enhancing Bingham’s body of work is portraiture and landscape painting. His portraits—representing a lifelong pursuit of commissioned work—for the most part depict prominent 19th century Missourians and provide a singular historical resource. Bingham’s landscapes were at first created as background scenes for his portraits and then fashioned as settings for his genre paintings; however, his landscapes evolved into a large body of work (many are still un-located) and cover the entire range of style then current in American landscape painting.

During a career of 45 years, from 1834 onward, Bingham was increasingly singled out as “The Missouri Artist” and he could in fact be considered the state’s first artist. In Missouri his artistic talent, initially as a portraitist, was highly regarded from the beginning of his career, a rare and encouraging position for any artist, and especially for Bingham who was self taught and self supporting and without academic or artistic connections. His portraits always remained in high demand. In an 1837 letter to James Rollins, Bingham wrote his credo at the beginning of his career: “There is no honorable sacrifice which I would not make to attain eminence in the art of which I have devoted myself.”

Today his childhood home in Arrow Rock, Missouri is a National Historic Landmark and his paintings now hang as national treasures in museums across the United States, iconic images of 19th-century frontier life. Bingham always believed in his own greatness as an artist and against all odds his life became a hero’s journey toward that ultimately gained eminence he sought.

The year 2011 will mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of George Caleb Bingham, now recognized as an “Old Master” of American Art.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Standard References by E. Maurice Bloch and Fred R. Kline:
 
Fred R. Kline, George Caleb Bingham: Artist of Missouri and the American Frontier. GCB Catalogue Raisonne Supplement (GeorgeCalebBingham.org), 2005, revised 2014

E. Maurice Bloch, The Paintings of George Caleb Bingham: A Catalogue Raisonne. University of Missouri Press, Columbia, 1986.

Bloch--George Caleb Bingham: The Evolution of an Artist Bloch & George Caleb Bingham: A Catalogue Raisonne (companion volumes). University of California Press, 1967.

Bloch--The Drawings of George Caleb Bingham With a Catalogue Raisonne. University of Missouri Press, Columbia, 1975.

SELECTED SOURCES (chronologically, beginning with the latest)

Paul C. Nagel. George Caleb Bingham, Missouri’s Famed Painter and Forgotten Politician. University of Missouri Press, Columbia, (April) 2005.

Michael Edward Shapiro. George Caleb Bingham. Abrams, NY, 1993.

Nancy Rash. The Paintings and Politics of George Caleb Bingham. Yale U Press, New Haven, 1991.

George Caleb Bingham, Exhibition Catalogue with essays by Paul C. Nagel, Barbara Groseclose, Elizabeth Johns, Michael Edward Shapiro, and John Wilmerding. St. Louis Art Museum/National Gallery of Art. Abrams, NY, 1990.

Ron Tyler. George Caleb Bingham, The Native Artist. American Frontier Life: Early Western Paintings and Prints. Abbeville, NY, 1987.

Matthew Baigell. “George Caleb Bingham”. Dictionary of American Art. Harper & Row, NY, 1979.

Albert Christ-Janer. George Caleb Bingham, Frontier Painter of Missouri. Abrams, NY, 1975.

Barbara Novak. “George Caleb Bingham, Missouri Classicism”. American Painting of the Nineteenth Century. Prager, NY, 1969.

John Francis McDermott. George Caleb Bingham, River Portraitist. U of OK Press, Norman, 1959.


Biography from Altermann Galleries and Auctioneers, I:
George Caleb Bingham

Born: Plantation in Augusta County, Virgina 1811
Died: Kansas City, Missouri 1879

Bingham’s family moved to frontier Missouri at Boon’s Lick in 1819. After his father died in 1827, he was apprenticed to a cabinetmaker but resolved to become an artist. He followed the advice of the painter Chester Harding to teach himself to paint by copying engravings with homemade pigments. By 1835, he was recognized as an able frontier painter, charging $20 per portrait in St. Louis. In 1836, he moved to Natchez where he charged $40. His portraits had become standard decorations in prosperous Missouri homes. He was able to afford three months at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 1837, observing genre as well as portrait painting. From 1838 to 1840, he sent paintings for exhibition in New York City. In 1841 he went to Washington, DC to paint portraits of leading politicians.

In St. Louis in 1845 he finished The Jolly Flatboatmen that was immediately popular in the form of an American Art Union engraving. This was followed by Fur Traders Descending the Missouri, Raftmen Playing Cards, and Lighter Relieving a Steamboat Aground.

Bingham entered politics in 1848, an interest that provided Stump Speaking and the Verdict of the People. A series of government jobs and European travel left less time for painting, but in 1872 he visited Colorado and thereafter painted the View of Pikes Peak that is in the Amon Carter Museum of Western Art collection.

Bingham was described as small and delicate but dynamic, an excellent conversationalist who was married three times, and always wore a wig to cover baldness from measles at 19.

Source:
Peggy and Harold Samuels, Encyclopedia of Artists of the American West, 1985


Biography from William A. Karges Fine Art - Beverly Hills:
Born in Virginia and raised in Missouri, and with only brief art instruction, George Caleb Bingham built a strong reputation for himself as a classical portraitist while still in his early 20’s. Encouraged by his success, Bingham sought more formal art instruction at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 1837.

Bingham continued painting portraits in Washington D.C. in the 1840’s, before eventually winning praise for his primary love, painting the genre scenes of the low-lying river areas, with all their atmospheric effect.

Also devoted to politics, Bingham was once elected to the Missouri State Legislature, but his win was overturned when the election was contested.

** If you discover credit omissions or have additional information to add, please let us know at registrar@AskART.com.


George Bingham is also mentioned in these AskART essays:
Western Painters

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