Artist Search
   
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z 

 Harold Matthews Brett  (1880 - 1955)

About: Harold Matthews Brett
 

Summary

Examples of his work

 
 

Quick facts

Exhibits - current  
 

Biography*

Museums

 
 

Book references

Magazine references pre-2007  
 

Discussion board

Signature Examples*

 
 
Buy and Sell: Harold Matthews Brett
  For sale ads

Auction results*

 
 

Wanted ads

Auctions upcoming for him*  
 

Dealers

Auction sales graphs*

 
 

What's my art worth?

Magazine ads pre-1998*  
 

Market Alert - Free

 
Lived/Active: Massachusetts/New York      Known for: portrait and landscape painter, illustrator

Login for full access
 
View AskART Services









*may require subscription

Available for Harold Matthews Brett:

Quick facts (Styles, locations, mediums, teachers, subjects, geography, etc.) (Harold Brett)

yes

Biographical information (Harold Brett)

yes

Book references (Harold Brett)

15

Museum references (Harold Brett)

1

Artwork Wanted (Harold Brett)

1

Dealers (Harold Brett)

2

Auction records - upcoming / past (Harold Brett)

58

Auction high record price (Harold Brett)

58

Signature Examples* (Harold Brett)

10

Analysis of auction sales (Harold Brett)

yes

Discussion board entries (Harold Brett)

0

Image examples of works (Harold Brett)

52

Please send me Alert Updates for Harold Matthews Brett (free)
What is an alert list?

Ad Code: 3
Harold Mathews Brett
from Auction House Records.
PORTRAIT OF MRS. HERBERT BRIGGS
Artwork images are copyright of the artist or assignee
This biography from the Archives of AskART:
Harold Matthews Brett is known for his illustrations and paintings of nostalgic New England scenes.  He grew up in Brookline, Massachusetts, and studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston under Philip Hale and Frank Benson.   Later, he moved to New York to study at the Art Students League with Walter Appleton Clark, H. Siddons Mowbray, and Kenyon Cox.

By then a well-trained artist, Brett went to Wilmington, Delaware, in 1906, to study further under the famous illustrator Howard Pyle.  He was soon able to make his professional debut in Harpers Weekly, and his work began to appear in most of the national magazines.  Eventually, Brett moved to Chatham on Cape Cod, and for several years was associated with the Fenway School of Illustration in Boston.  Brett particularly liked to do New England subjects with an historical setting; he also did a series of portraits of Cape Cod sea captains.  Eventually, he specialized in portraiture, maintaining studios in New York City and Chatham.

It might be said that Harold Brett occupied a similar position in art history as Norman Rockwell.  Brett's paintings, drawings, and illustrations, which can be seen on exhibit at the Cape Museum of Fine Arts, evoke a similar nostalgic feeling for a different, simpler time.

A resident of Chatham, Brett was primarily an illustrator, working for magazines such as Colliers, Ladies Home Journal, and Country Gentleman.  He also illustrated books: Lucretia Hales The Peterkin Papers and several by the Cape author Joseph C. Lincoln.

Brett also devoted time to portraits, which were simple, straightforward works.  His subjects were undoubtedly painted the way they would like the world to see them: The men were composed and serious, the women genteel.

Brett's paintings of local Cape scenes have had the greatest appeal.  Viewers are attracted by the quaintness of the works.  Done in the 1930s and 1940s, they show none of the influences of modernism.  Although Brett studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, with Frank Benson, he seemingly was not influenced by Benson's style of Impressionism.

Wychmere Harbor is a quiet water view, as is HarwichportCongregational Church, Chatham evokes a Currier and Ives image of a snow-covered scene, complete with horse-drawn sleigh.  Chatham Fish Shack, completed in 1935, has a view through the shadows of a fish shack into an open door that frames a bright spot, where a man and his boat are highlighted in the glare of the sun.  The painting is well composed and carefully structured and goes beyond just the nostalgic in its aesthetic qualities.  The Cranberry Pickers, done for Lincoln's Cape Cod Yesterdays, nicely captures the era of bonneted women harvesting the berries.  The Graveyard, Truro projects a somber mood with the dark gravestones ominous against a pale sunset.  Lady on Skis, was an illustration for Colliers, and shows Brett's ability to define an attitude and expression.  The woman in the drawing is shown with a startled look as she tries to maintain her balance during a precarious slide down a hill.

Brett's art is seen best in the context of his work as an illustrator.  He depicted a time and place that can be recalled with affection.  It is easy to imagine oneself lingering in front of one of his Cape scenes, trying to recapture the charm of that era.

Sources include:
The Illustrator In America, 1880-1980, A Century of Illustration
, by Walt and Roger Reed
Cape Code Times, "Brett Illustrates Charm of Cape Era Gone By", December 14, 2000)

** If you discover credit omissions or have additional information to add, please let us know at registrar@AskART.com.
  go to top home | site map | site terms | AskART services & subscriptions | contact | about us
  copyright © 2000-2014 AskART all rights reserved ® AskART and Artists' Bluebook are registered trademarks

  A |  B |  C |  D-E |  F-G |  H |  I-K |  L |  M |  N-P |  Q-R |  S |  T-V |  W-Z  
  frequently searched artists 1, 2, more...  
  art appraisals, art for sale, auction records, misc artists