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 Jim (James) Dine  (1935 - )

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Lived/Active: New York/Ohio      Known for: pop expression, sculpture, graphics

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Ad Code: 1
Jim Dine
from Auction House Records.
Hearts
© 2001 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
This biography from the Archives of AskART:
A contemporary painter and assemblage artist, Jim Dine has created gestural, sometimes heavily impastoed work with a style that hearkens to Abstract Expressionism.  A major early influence was Jasper Johns from whom he learned methods of random juxtaposing of real objects shadowed by painted copies.

Since the mid-1970s, his work has reflected his skill as a draftsman and has focused more on traditional pictorial problems rather than leading-edge improvisation.

He was raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, and studied there at the Art Academy and the University of Cincinnati from where he earned a B.F.A. in 1958.  In 1959, he moved to New York City where he established a studio for the major part of his career, although he was artist-in-residence for short periods including Williams College in Massachusetts, Oberlin College in Ohio, and Cornell College in New York state.

Early in New York, he was part a spontaneous performance artist group, "Happenings," that included Red Grooms, Allan Kaprow, and Claes Oldenburg.  His pieces from that time, some with flashing lights, were part of the assemblage of events staged by those artists regardless of whether or not they had an audience.

In the following years, many of his canvases had big letters and objects such as hatchets and saws that suggested viewer participation.

His work is represented in most of the major art museums featuring contemporary American work including in New York the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum.  A special exhibition of his work, "Jim Dine Walking Memory," was held at the Cincinnati Art Museum in October, 1999 to January 2000.

Source:
ARTnews, February 1996, "Dine Unrobed"
Peter Hastings Falk (ed.), Who Was Who in American Art
Matthew Baigell, Dictionary of American Art

Biography from Denis Bloch Fine Art:
Jim Dine was born June 16, 1935, in Cincinnati, Ohio.  He studied at night at the Cincinnati Art Academy during his senior year of high school, and then attended the University of Cincinnati, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and Ohio University, Athens, from which he received his B.F.A. in 1957.

Dine moved to New York in 1959 and soon became a pioneer creator of ‘Happenings’ together with Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenburg, and Robert Whitman. He exhibited at the Judson Gallery, New York, in 1958 and 1959, and his first solo show took place at the Reuben Gallery, New York, in 1960.

Dine is closely associated with the development of Pop Art in the early 1960s. Frequently he affixed everyday objects, such as tools, rope, shoes, neckties, and other articles of clothing, and even a bathroom sink, to his canvases. Characteristically, these objects were Dine’s personal possessions.  This autobiographical content was evident in Dine’s early works and appeared as well in subsequent recurrent themes and images, such as the Palettes, Hearts (homage to his wife, Nancy), and Bathrobe Self-Portraits.

Jim Dine first used the image of a man's bathrobe, with the man airbrushed out of it, to create a self-portrait in 1964.  Working from that same ad clipped out of The New York Times, he has repeated the theme of himself as an unseen figure in a robe ever since. "The ad shows a robe," said Dine," it somehow looked like me, and I thought I'd make that a symbol for me."

In 1976 Dine produced a series of large-scale paintings and original prints of "invisible men" in monumental bathrobes.  The works reflect his new attention to drawing and painterly techniques to achieve a quieter, more romantic and sensual effect.  Dine has noted that "the robes have become much more mysterious than they used to be and that’s because I understand them more." Dine has also made a number of three-dimensional works and environments, and is well-known for his drawings and graphic prints.  He has written and illustrated several books of poetry.

In 1965, Dine was a guest lecturer at Yale University, New Haven, and artist-in-residence at Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio.  He was a visiting artist at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, in 1967.  From 1967 to 1971, he and his family lived in London.

Dine has been given solo shows in museums in Europe and the United States. In 1970, the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, organized a major retrospective of his work, and in 1978 the Museum of Modern Art, New York, presented a retrospective of his etchings. Dine lives in New York and Vermont.

Quote:
“I have come to terms with a lot of things, because, when all's said and done, there's really very little one can do about a lot of things. You just accept them. The point is you just have to keep on working and you just have to keep on living.”

Select Museum Collections:
Guggenheim Museum, New York
The British Museum, London
Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
Minneapolis Institute of Arts, MN
Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, MO
Baltimore Museum of Art, MD
Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles


Biography from GallArt.com:
Jim Dine, American (1935 - )

Born in 1935 at Cincinnati, Ohio. He studied at the University of Cincinnati and at the Boston School of Fine and Applied Arts in Boston, Massachusetts from 1953 to 1957. In 1957 he received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Ohio University, Athens. He moved to New York in 1959. He staged his first Happenings with Claes Oldenburg and Allan Kaprow at the Judson Gallery, New York. He had his first one- man exhibition at the Reuben Gallery, New York. Between 1960 and 1965 he had various guest professorships, among others at Yale University, New Haven, and Oberlin College, Ohio. He was represented at the Venice Biennale in 1964, and at the documents "4" in Kassel in 1968.

From the early 1970s Dine's oil paintings, prints (perhaps his most successful work, usually sensitive and simple depictions of tools, robes, etc.) and drawings became increasingly figurative. In 1957 he received a bachelor of fine arts degree from Ohio University. After graduation, he moved to New York City and became involved with Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, and Roy Lichtenstein whose work moved away from abstract expressionism toward pop art.

Dine incorporated images of everyday objects in his art, but he diverged from the coldness and impersonal nature of pop art by making works that fused personal passions and everyday experiences. His repeated use of familiar and personally significant objects, such as a robe, hands, tools, and hearts, is a signature of his art. In his early work, Dine created mostly assemblages in which he attached actual objects to his painted canvases. From 1959 to 1960, Dine also was a pioneer of happenings, works of art that took the form of theatrical events or demonstrations.

In 1967 Dine and his family moved to London, England, where he devoted his energies to printmaking and drawing. Dine's attention turned to sculptural work in the early 1980s when he created sculptures based on the sculpture Venus de Milo.

His recent art uses imagery borrowed from ancient Greek, Egyptian, and African objects. In his paintings, drawings, sculptures, graphics, collages and assemblages he combined different techniques with handwritten texts and words and set real everyday objects against undefined backgrounds. The objects were both commonplace and personal, both poetic and ironic, reflecting his feelings about life. His constantly varied bathrobe, transparent to the gaze of the world, was a kind of metaphor for a self-portrait.

(Courtesy of Rogallery.com)

Biography from Leslie Sacks Fine Art:
Jim Dine was born in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1935. Jim Dine grew up in what he regards as the beautiful landscape of the Midwest, a tone and time to which he returns constantly. Jim Dine studied at the University of Cincinnati and the Boston Museum School and received his BFA from Ohio University in 1957.

Jim Dine, renowned for his wit and creativity as a Pop and Happenings artist, has a restless, searching intellect that leads him to challenge himself constantly. Over four decades, Jim Dine has produced more than three thousand paintings, sculptures, drawings, and prints, as well as performance works, stage and book designs, poetry, and even music. Jim Dine's art has been the subject of numerous individual and group shows and is in the permanent collections of museums around the world.

Jim Dine's earliest art - Happenings and an incipient form of pop art - emerged against the backdrop of abstract expressionism and action painting in the late 1950s. Objects, most importantly household tools, began to appear in his work at about the same time; a hands-on quality distinguished these pieces, which combine elements of painting, sculpture, and installation, as well as works in various other media, including etching and lithography. Through a restricted range of obsessive images, which continue to be reinvented in various guises - bathrobe, heart, outstretched hand, wrought-iron gate, and Venus de Milo - Jim Dine presents compelling stand-ins for himself and mysterious metaphors for his art.

The human body conveyed though anatomical fragments and suggested by items of clothing and other objects, emerges as one of Jim Dine's most urgent subjects. Making use of the language of expressionism and applying it to themes concerning the artist as a creative but solitary individual, Jim Dine ultimately asserts himself as a late-twentieth-century heir to the romantic tradition.

Biography from Art Cellar Exchange:

Jim Dine began his career as a professional artist in the late 1950s and quickly became associated with the Pop Art movement occurring in New York at that time.  His work differed from others in the movement, however, possessing a painterly quality that contained an element of personal expression.  In an interview with Art News magazine, Jim Dine said, "Pop Art is only one facet of my work.  More than popular images, I'm interested in personal images." This may explain why Dine frequently chose self-portraiture and subjects that surrounded his personal life, as a subject in his work.


Over the past fifty years, Jim Dine has created a great deal of artwork involving the human form. The artist's initial interest in depicting the human character, and more specifically self-portraiture, began early in his career.   His interest in figurative art soon transitioned into vibrant hearts, robes and flowers that Dine depicts in his work of the 1980s and forward.  Instead of his characteristically more realistic approach towards rendering his subjects, he progressively moved towards an interest in symbolism wherein the images of robes symbolized himself and the popular images of hearts symbolized his love for his wife.

The work of Jim Dine is represented in most of the major modern and contemporary art museums including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum.


Biography from RoGallery.com:
Jim Dine was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and first studied painting in evening courses at the Cincinnati Art Academy while he was still in high school.  He then attended the University of Cincinnati, the school of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and Ohio University.  He moved to New York in 1959 and in that year staged his first happening. At the same time, he was painting, working in collage, and creating his first prints, the Car Crash series which commemorated the death of a friend.

In the ensuing years, his work took on a more figurative, yet still highly personal style. He has created an autobiography through objects which are privately symbolic. His bathrobe studies, for instance, are progressive self-portraits. Dine's prints reflect his skill as a draftsman and his virtuosity as a painter. Frequently, these skills are combined, but more often he has chosen to separate them so that some prints dramatically display his linear techniques and others his power as a painter. The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, and the Brandeis Museum in Waltham, Massachusetts are only a few public institutions permanently exhibiting his work.

Biography from Edward Cella Art+Architecture:
Jim Dine was born June 16, 1935, in Cincinnati, Ohio.  He studied at night at the Cincinnati Art Academy during his senior year of high school, and then attended the University of Cincinnati, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and Ohio University, Athens, from which he received his B.F.A. in 1957.

Dine moved to New York in 1959, and soon became associated with the development of Pop Art.  He exhibited at the Judson Gallery, New York, in 1958 and 1959, and his first solo show took place at the Reuben Gallery, New York, in 1960.

Frequently Dine affixed everyday objects, such as tools, rope, shoes, neckties, and other articles of clothing, and even a bathroom sink, to his canvases.  Characteristically, these objects were Dine’s personal possessions.  This autobiographical content was evident in Dine’s early Crash series of 1959–60 and appeared as well in subsequent recurrent themes and images, such as the Palettes, Hearts, and bathrobe Self-Portraits.

Dine has also made a number of three-dimensional works and environments, and is well-known for his drawings and prints.  He has written and illustrated several books of poetry.

Biography from Boca Raton Museum of Art:
Born in 1935, Jim Dine is an American painter and print maker, often associated with POP art. He studied at University of Cincinnati and Boston Museum School; 1957-58, and received his BFA from Ohio University, Athens, and then enrolled in graduate study.

He was a leading organizer of Happenings, 1959-60, and an early creator of Environments.  In the early 1960’s he began to attach real objects to his canvases, thus establishing a visual dialogue between the energetically painted setting. His wit comes to the fore in juxtapositions that create visual puns, in the aggrandizing of common objects and in the deliberate confusion of sexual and mechanical elements. Since the mid-1970’s he has focused increasingly on technique; in a recent series of paintings, he executes a single image on a large scale, employing various compositional devices and color combinations. He is a masterly printmaker and draftsman.

Exhibitions: In 1964, the Venice Biennale; 1970 Retrospective at Whitney Museum of American Art, NY; 1980 Elected to American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, NY; 1984-85 Retrospective at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, travels; 1988 Retrospective at Galleria d'Arte Moderna Ca'Pesaro, Venice; 1988-90 Retrospective of drawings at The Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, travels; 1990-91 Retrospective exhibition at the Isetan Museum of Art, Tokyo and the Museum of Art, Osaka; 1993-94 Exhibition of drawings at the Madison Art Center, Wisconsin, travels, Retrospective exhibition at Borås Konstmuseum, Sweden.

By The Boca Raton Museum of Art
Catalina Torres (Intern)


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