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 Glenna Goodacre  (1939 - )

About: Glenna Goodacre
 

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Lived/Active: New Mexico/Texas      Known for: child genre and figure sculpture

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Glenna Goodacre
from Auction House Records.
He Is They Are
Artwork images are copyright of the artist or assignee
This biography from the Archives of AskART:
With a career spanning nearly five decades, Glenna Goodacre has become well-known for her bronze sculptures, specializing in sensitive portraits of children in action. Another subject matter is American Indians including the New Mexico Pueblo Indians exemplified by her depiction of a sacred ceremony, The Basket Dance.

Likely her most important commission is the women's memorial in Washington D.C. commemorating the women who served in the Vietnam War.  Another prestigious work, "After the Ride," a seven-foot high statue of President Ronald Reagan, was unveiled in Fall, 1998 at the Reagan Library in Southern California.

She was born in Texas, graduated from Colorado College, and then studied at the Art Students League in New York.  From 1983, her home has been in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

She has won numerous awards from the National Sculpture Society and Allied Artists of America as well as the Gold Medal from the National Academy of Design of which she is an Associate member.  In 1993, she was awarded the Knickerkbocker Artists' Gold Medal for Distinguished Achievement in American Art.

Sources include:
Art of the West
Southwest Art
Donald Martin Reynolds, Masters of American Sculpture


Biography from Whistle Pik Galleries:
A passion for portraying the human figure is reflected in the work of Glenna Goodacre. Ranging from small head studies to heroic public monuments, her bronzes are alive with expression and movement. Her most well-known work is the Vietnam Women’s Memorial installed in Washington, D.C. in 1993.

Goodacre’s ability to capture emotion in sculptural form has been perfected over several decades of an award-winning career. After graduation from Colorado College and study at the Art Students League in New York, she became a successful painter. Then, nearly 35 years ago, she made a 6-inch bronze of her young daughter and quickly turned to sculpture.

In 1998, her 7½-foot standing portrait of Ronald Reagan was unveiled at the Reagan Library in California. A bronze cast of the same figure is at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. In 2003, she completed a heroic figure of legendary West Point Coach Colonel Earl “Red” Blaik for the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Indiana. It will be unveiled in May, 2004.

Goodacre has more than 50 other bronze portraits in public collections in the United States, including sculptures of Dwight D. Eisenhower, Barbara Jordan, Katherine Anne Porter, Scott Joplin, Greer Garson, Dan Blocker, and General “Hap” Arnold.

In 2000, Goodacre’s rendering of Sacagawea, the Native American interpreter for explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, appeared on the face of a new dollar coin issued by the U.S. Mint. Goodacre’s design depicting the Shoshone teenager with her infant son was selected for its “remarkable emotional depth” from among 121 entries by 20 invited artists. Goodacre’s concept was unveiled by First Lady Hillary Clinton at the White house in 1999.

In 1997, Goodacre was selected as the winning sculptor for the monumental Irish Memorial for Philadelphia. Completed and unveiled in 2003 at Penn’s Landing, the massive bronze is Glenna’s most ambitious public sculpture—with 35 life-size figures, and is a favorite stop for Philadelphia’s many visitors.

An academician of the National Academy of Design since 1994 and a fellow of the National Sculpture Society since 1981, Goodacre has won many awards at their New York exhibitions. Goodacre has received honorary doctorates from her alma mater Colorado College, and Texas Tech University in her hometown of Lubbock.

In 2002, she won the James Earl Fraser Sculpture Award at the Prix De West Exhibition. In 2003, she was awarded the Gold Medal For Career Achievement from The Portrait Society of America, the Texas Medal Of Arts, and she was inducted into the Cowgirl Hall Of Fame.

Glenna Goodacre divides her time between Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she has maintained a studio since 1983, and Dallas, Texas, where her husband, C. L. “Mike” Schmidt, has a law practice, the Schmidt Firm.

Biography from Cavalier Galleries Inc.:
Ranging in size from tiny head studies to huge public monuments, Goodacre’s bronze sculptures are recognized for their exciting expression and interesting composition. Her most well-known work is the Vietnam Women’s Memorial installed in Washington, D.C. in 1993.

After graduation from Colorado College and study at the Art Students League in New York, she became a successful painter of portraits and Native American subjects; 30 years ago, she made a 6-inch bronze of her young daughter and quickly turned to sculpture. In 1998, her 8-foot standing portrait of Ronald Reagan was unveiled at the Reagan Library in California with another cast at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City.

Glenna has more than 50 other bronze portraits in public collections in the United States, including sculptures of Dwight D. Eisenhower, Barbara Jordan, Katherine Anne Porter, Scott Joplin, Greer Garson, Dan Blocker, and General “Hap” Arnold. In 2004, her heroic bronze portrait of legendary West Point Coach Colonel Earl “Red” Blaik was unveiled at the National College Football Hall Of Fame.

In 2000, Goodacre’s rendering of Sacagawea, the Native American interpreter for explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, appeared on the face of a new dollar coin issued by the U.S. Mint. Selected from 121 entries by 20 invited artists, her design depicting the Shoshone teenager with her infant son was unveiled by First Lady Hillary Clinton at the White House in 1999. Goodacre was selected in 1997 as sculptor for the monumental Irish Memorial in downtown Philadelphia. Completed and installed at Penn’s Landing in 2003, the massive bronze is her most ambitious public sculpture—with 35 life-size figures.

An academician of the National Academy of Design since 1994 and a fellow of the National Sculpture Society since 1981, Goodacre has won many awards at their exhibitions in New York. Goodacre has received honorary doctorates from Colorado College, her alma mater, and Texas Tech University in her hometown of Lubbock. 

In 2002, her work won the James Earl Fraser Sculpture Award at the Prix De West Exhibition. In 2003, she was awarded the prestigious Texas Medal of Arts and later that year was inducted into the Cowgirl Hall Of Fame in Fort Worth. In 2004 she designed the Children’s Medal of Honor awarded to First Lady Laura Bush in Dallas by the Greater Texas Community Partners. In 2005 a street in Lubbock, Texas, was named Glenna Goodacre Boulevard and in Santa Fe at the State Capitol, Governor Bill Richardson awarded her the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.

Glenna is a life-long visitor to New Mexico and a resident since 1983. She and her husband attorney C.L. Mike Schmidt of the Schmidt Firm in Dallas and Santa Fe have homes in Santa Fe and Pecos, New Mexico.

Biography from Nedra Matteucci Galleries:
Most Americans are familiar with Glenna Goodacre’s sculptural contribution to the nation through her Vietnam Women’s Memorial installed in 1993 on the Mall in Washington, D.C.  Her 1999 design for the Sacagawea dollar contributes greatly to her renown.  Goodacre’s incredible range of work has made her enormously popular and very widely recognized.

Texas-born Goodacre began her artistic endeavors as a painter rather than a sculptor. She graduated from Colorado College and studied at the Art Students League of New York.  Eventually, she began to work in three dimensions, shaping portrait busts and figures in wax and clay, transforming herself from painter to sculptor.  Central to her career, however, has always been an emphasis on the creative challenges of the human figure.  She is especially admired for the deft hand with which she portrays the entire range of emotions and character through her subjects' facial expressions.  Goodacre has been awarded many important public commissions.  In 1998 she created a seven-foot standing portrait of President Ronald Reagan depicted in casual riding attire for the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City and Reagan’s presidential library in California.  In 1997 Goodacre was selected as the winning sculptor in an international competition to create the Irish Memorial at Penn’s Landing in Philadelphia.  This is Goodacre’s most ambitious public sculpture to date; it comprises 35 life-size figures documenting the potato famine in Ireland and the subsequent immigration of survivors to the United States.

Goodacre has been an academician of the National Academy of Design since 1994 and a fellow of the National Sculpture Society since 1981.  She has won many awards at these institutions’ New York exhibitions.  Goodacre has received honorary doctorates from her alma mater, Colorado College, and Texas Tech University in her hometown of Lubbock.  In 2002, she won the James Earl Fraser Sculpture Award at the Prix de West Exhibition.  In 2003, she was awarded the Gold Medal For Career Achievement from The Portrait Society of America and the Texas Medal of Arts.  She was inducted into the Cowgirl Hall of Fame in 2003.

Source: Nedra Matteucci Galleries, representing Glenna Goodacre

Biography from Knox Galleries:
A lifelong passion for portraying the human figure is reflected in the work of sculptor Glenna Goodacre. Convincing expression and engaging composition are hallmarks of her bronzes, ranging in size from small head studies to heroic public monuments, the most recognized of which is the Vietnam Women's Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Goodacre graduated from Colorado College and studied at the Art Students League in New York. Thirty years ago, she made a 6 inch bronze depicting her young daughter and quickly turned from painting to sculpture. Now Goodacre paints only as preliminary study for three dimensional work.

In 1998, her 7'/Z foot standing portrait of Ronald Reagan was unveiled at the Reagan Library in California. Another bronze cast of the same figure is at the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City. Goodacre has more than 40 other bronze portraits in public collections in the United States, including sculptures of Dwight D. Eisenhower, Barbara Jordan, Katherine Anne Porter, Scott Joplin, Greer Garson, Dan Blocker, and General "Hap" Arnold.

In 2000, Goodacre's rendering of Sacagawea, the Native American interpreter for explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, appeared on the face of a new dollar coin issued by the U.S. Mint. Goodacre's design depicting the Shoshone teenager with her infant son was selected for its "remarkable emotional depth" from among 121 entries by 20 invited artists. In another major competition, Goodacre was selected as the winning sculptor for the Irish Memorial, a monument that will stand in downtown Philadelphia near Penn's Landing. When completed in spring 2002, the massive bronze will be her most ambitious public sculpture with 25 life size figures.

An academician of the National Academy of Design since 1994 and a fellow of the National Sculpture Society since 1981, Goodacre has won many awards at their exhibitions in New York. For more than a decade, she has been a participant in the Art in Embassies program, exhibiting work at U.S. embassies worldwide. Goodacre has received honorary doctorates from her alma mater, Colorado College, and Texas Tech University in her hometown of Lubbock. In February 2000, Business and Professional Women U.S.A. presented her with their annual achievement award in Washington, D.C.

Biography from Altermann Galleries and Auctioneers, II:
A realist sculptor and painter of the figure, Glenna Goodacre was born in Lubbock, Texas in 1939 and then lived in Boulder, Colorado. “I grew up around cowboys in west Texas,” she observes, “and I just don’t find them all that fascinating. And I do not do horses. I’m not into animals at all. I’m into people. Indians have grown to be dominant themes in my work, and I do a lot of women because too few artists have really told their story well. I want to be thoughts of as a ‘portrayer of people.’”

“Fortunately, my parents recognized that I had talent so they arranged for me to receive private lessons. Beyond that, I majored in art all through school.” She graduated from Colorado College and later studied at the Art Students League in New York City. Told by an instructor that she could never sculpt, she did not begin until 1971, but she doesn’t believe that her sculpture “would be as successful if I hadn’t painted. After you work with three dimensionals, then go back to paintings, you discover how much one complements the other."

"I want my work to do more than just stare out at people. Western art demands that you do more than just present a head study. I try to tell a different story about the people in my art. I always try to show happy Indians, especially when I work with children. Faces fascinate me, and I present the colorful, happy people that appeal to me.”

She is listed in "Who’s Who in American Art" and was featured in "Southwest Art", December 1976 and "Artists of the Rockies", winter 1976.

Resource:
"Contemporary Western Artists", by Peggy and Harold Samuels,1982, Judd’s Inc., Washington, D.C.

Biography from Morris & Whiteside Galleries:
Glenna Goodacre is one of the United States' better-known living sculptors.  For over 30 years, she has enjoyed critical acclaim with bronzes that range in size from small head studies to heroic public monuments.  Her work may be found in public, private, and corporate collections throughout the world.

A fellow of the National Sculptor Society since 1981, Goodacre became a member of the National Academy of Design in 1994.  She received honorary doctorates from Colorado College, her alma mater, and Texas Tech University in her hometown of Kubbock, Texas.  Goodacre divides her time between Santa Fe, New Mexico where her studio is located and Dallas, Texas wher her husband, C.L. "Mike" Schmidt, has a law practice.

Goodacre is most celebrated for creating the Women's Memorial on the mall in Washington, D.C. and is also widely recognized for the design of the U.S. millennium dollar coin with the image of Sacagawea and her infant son, Jean Baptiste.  Goodacre has sculpted over forty bronze portraits including two larger than life size standing bronze sculptures of President Ronald Reagan, one standing at the Regean Library in California, and the other at the Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City.

Recently, Goodacre was selected from an international competition with over 100 entries to create the Irish Memorial for the city of Philadelphia.  Located in a 1.71 acre park overlooking the Delaware River at historic Penn's Landing, the memorial represents Goodacre's most ambitious project to date.  Out of this project have come forty new bronzes, the largest group of new pieces since her landmark 1989 exhibition in Santa Fe.


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Glenna Goodacre is also mentioned in these AskART essays:
Sculptors
Women Artists

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